Archive of ‘Safety’ category

At-Risk Groups for Traumatic Brain Injury

football brain injury

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major topic in public health. As an under-discussed but extremely serious condition, TBI awareness needs to be spread among the general population. And even more than the general population, several specific groups need to understand that their situations call for special attention to TBI. If you’re a member of one of these groups, be aware, educate yourself, and stay safe to avoid lasting and brutalizing damage to your body’s central organ.

Athletes and Risks for Brain Injury

Athletes are among the population most at risk for a TBI. Players of heavy hitting sports such as football and boxing are, of course, at the deepest risk. But TBI affects more athletes than just linebackers and welterweight champions. Any athlete can suffer head trauma. In fact, according to the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS), cycling is the sport that most commonly associated with brain injury. (The other items in the top five are football, baseball/softball, basketball, water sports (diving, swimming, etc.), and recreational vehicle riding.)

 

If you’re an athlete—of any kind—be careful. Sports enthusiasts suffer TBIs very often. Any small bang to the head can leave you with lasting damage. Even relatively violence-free sports are common sources of injury (see basketball on that list up there?). Fast movements of all sports lead to strong blows to the head. Watch yourself.

Construction Workers and Risks for Brain Injury

Those “hard hat required” signs are there for a good reason. When working construction, hard and heavy object are very likely to come dislodged and knock your head around. Even a small object can severely damage your brain if it falls far and fast enough. Construction workers are vulnerable to pails, planks, wrenches, and countless other objects falling without warning and hitting them in the head.

 

And falling objects aren’t even the most frequent cause of TBIs in construction work. Human falls are. A 2009 study from the medical journal Brain Injury found that simply falling down and hitting a head on the ground was the biggest source of brain injury among construction workers. Construction sites are filled with many tripping hazards, and the fall construction workers take are often longer and harder than the falls people take in most workplaces. If you are a construction worker, be careful on site, wear your hard hat, and walk carefully.

Any Job that Involves Driving

According to the Mayo Clinic, vehicular accidents frequently cause TBIs. Professions in which workers need to drive around regularly—taxi drivers, delivery drivers, postal workers, police, home health aides, etc.—can be potent sources of brain injury danger. Car accidents are, of course, causes of every kind of health problem under the sun, and workers in these jobs are likely already aware of the problems associated with crashes.
If you drive for a living, review your traffic safety skills. Practice defensive driving, watch your surroundings carefully, and wear your seat belt. Even a minor fender bender can give your head a big bump and leave your mind altered forever. Professional drivers can never be careful on the road.

Understanding Brain Injury

nutrition for brain injury

Brain injury or traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when there is sudden damage of the skull. Brain injury can be categorized in two parts namely: open brain injury and closed brain injury. The former takes place when a part of the brain is damaged by something intrusive, such as a bullet. This can turn fatal within no time at all. On the other hand, closed brain injury is a more common one as it happens when one gets hit by a heavy object, or suffers a severe blow to the skull. This can result in a concussion or contusion. Whatever the nature of this injury may be, it is very important to take immediate action to avoid any unfavorable circumstances. It is difficult to know for sure when a brain injury happens. Each brain injury is unique in its own way and can have various kinds of ramifications. These are some of the most common causes of brain injury:

  • Falling (by accident)
  • Blow from a heavy object
  • Motor vehicle (car) accidents
  • Violent assaults

It is estimated that approximately 2.6 million people annually suffer from some form of brain injury in the US. It is commonly referred to as the silent epidemic, since many of those afflicted suffer in silence. Even more disturbing is the fact that 52,000 people die every year from this type of injury. Consequently, serious measures must be taken, and more people should be made aware of TBI through social awareness initiatives.

Consequences

Brain injuries are also classified in two parts in terms of consequences. There are mild and severe brain injuries. When the disorientation is less than 30 minutes, it is known as mild brain injury. However, the more dangerous is severe brain injury. That is when the disorientation is far more than 30 minutes. A patient goes into a state of confusion. Physically, some parts of the body can stop working altogether, and this type of injury can even result in death. In this case, the effects can be both temporary and permanent. Unfortunately, a head injury can change a person’s life forever both mentally and physically. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to recognize the cause as soon as possible and take appropriate measures.  

Treatment and prevention

We all know that the brain is one of the most complex part of our body. For this reason, it is very difficult to diagnose and treat a head injury correctly. It can suffice to say that the diagnosis of a brain injury is directly proportional to its severity. The best way to increase chances of treatment is to visit the hospital as soon as one notices the obvious symptoms. Prevention is better than cure. It may sound unbelievably cliché, but it is completely applicable, especially with TBI’s. The significance of this fact can never be neglected. Here are some measures you can take to minimize the risk of a head injury:

  • Use seat belts while driving
  • Use appropriate head gear when taking part in a sports event
  • Never drive under the influence of alcohol  
  • Avoid dangerous or reckless activities

Do you or someone you know suffer from a TBI? How did it happen? Leave your comments below:

Energy Drinks & TBI

 

Between extra curricular activities like sports, an afterschool job, and a backpack full of homework, as a parent of a busy teenager, you may consider yourself to be lucky if you see your teen at all. Like millions of other young people, your teenager may drink one of the many popular energy drinks from time to time to keep going. If you’re bothered by your teen’s consumption of the sugary and highly caffeinated drink, there’s another reason to urge your teenager to stop drinking energy drinks. Recent studies suggest that teens who drink energy drinks may be more likely to have a traumatic brain injury.

Link Between Energy Drinks and TBIs

 

If your teen drinks an energy drink every now and then it doesn’t automatically mean that he or she will suffer a head injury, but according to a recent Canadian study published in PLOS ONE, the chances may be greater. Researchers theorize that young people who drink energy drinks on a regular basis may be bigger risk takers which may result in traumatic brain injuries (TBI). Think of the advertising that surrounds energy drinks. It isn’t targeted to the young people who spend their time studying, but rather those who are into extreme sports or young people who want to be “wild” or the life of a party.

 

Additionally, teens who reported having a TBI in the past year were 7 times more likely to report drinking at least five energy drinks within a week. The data is compared to teens, within the same age group, who did not have a TBI. Even more troubling results from the study reveal that of the 10,272 teens, between 7th and 12th grade, those who had experienced a TBI within a year were more likely to drink energy drinks mixed with alcohol. Not only is that behavior problematic in terms of underage drinking, but the level of caffeine in energy drinks masks alcohol making it harder to determine when to stop drinking alcohol.

Permanent Damage

 

Given the information revealed in the study, there could be a strong argument that alcohol is really the issue when it comes to teens and TBIs, but more research needs to be done. Researchers conclude that energy drinks with a high amount of caffeine and alcohol, both consumed on their own, can have damaging effects on a developing brain. Remember, the brain doesn’t fully develop until mid-20s to early 30s. Any damage that occurs during the development stages can be permanent. Energy drinks and alcohol can have the same effects on the brains as illicit drugs. Not only can it affect a young person’s brain, but also damage overall health and lead to death.

 

What Can You Do?

As a parent, it may be difficult to take control of your teen’s energy drink consumption, particularly if he or she has a busy extra curricular or social life. The best way to encourage healthy habits is by modeling healthy habits. When you have an open and honest discussion with your teen about drug use and other risky behaviors, incorporate energy drink use into the discussion. If your son or daughter plays sports or stays up late doing homework, encourage natural ways of boosting energy through foods, water, or even caffeinated tea or a small cup of coffee. You can’t keep your teen away from the world of energy drinks, but you can help him or her know the potential dangers.

 

Back to School & Preventing Brain Injuries

During spring and summer months, as well as weekends, children are more likely to have head injuries, particularly when they are most active outdoors. As a result, many parents find it hard to keep their children injury-free during summer vacation, but once school starts the incidence of injury continues with school sports and during regular activities throughout the school day.

 

Although tripping, falling, and getting minor bumps and bruises seem to be a natural part of being a kid, injuries to the head must always be taken seriously. The Brain Injury Association of America reports that each year, 62,000 children between the ages of 0-19 sustain brain injuries that require hospitalization. Additionally, over 500,000 are treated in the ER for TBI. While you can’t always prevent injuries from occurring, you can make sure your children are safe at school and during extracurricular activities.

In the Classroom, On the Playground

 

Teachers do their best to closely monitor children in the classroom and in the hallways, but children are notorious for goofing around, not thinking about the potentially dangerous outcome. The playground can be particularly dangerous and a frequent place for injuries, despite the close monitoring from a trained staff member. Accidents can happen in the blink of an eye. Although you can’t watch every move your child makes during his or her school day, you can remind him or her how to stay safer at school.

 

  • Avoid engaging in horseplay. Pulling on a friend’s shirt during a game of tag or purposefully bumping or tripping a classmate can cause serious injuries.

 

  • Don’t lean back in chairs and keep all four legs of the chair on the floor. If the chair slips, your child could hit his or her head on the floor, causing a brain injury.

 

  • Follow all rules in the classroom, in the lunchroom, in the hallways, and on the playground.

 

Additionally, as a parent, you should recognize the signs of a TBI, in case your child comes home from school seeming a little “off”. If he or she was engaging in unsafe behaviors he or she may be more likely to withhold information about an injury.

After School, On the Field

 

Organized sports are a wonderful way for your child to gain confidence, be healthy, and work as a team player. Unfortunately, sports are also a common way to receive a life-changing head injury. From a bicycle ride with friends after school to leading the school in a cheer while flipping in the air to making a touchdown before being tackled, most types of sports are potentially dangerous and can lead to a TBI. As a parent, it’s your responsibility to be involved in your child’s extra curricular sports. Showing up and cheering your son or daughter on is encouraging, but make sure the sport is as safe as possible.

 

Talk to the coaches about their safety plans or how they treat head injuries. Do they make players stay out of games until they are given a “go ahead” or are they put back in the game right away? Do players wear protective gear all the time or only during games or matches? Is the sport age appropriate for your child or is it too aggressive? Anytime you feel like your child’s safety is in danger, you should speak up; it could prevent a TBI.

Hazing and Collegiate Level Play

language barrier

October is National Bullying Prevention Month, and so we turn the spotlight on an organized form of bullying: college athletic hazing. Hazing comes in many forms, including the forced consumption of alcohol, engagement in sexual activities, and other physically and emotionally devastating actions. Hazing is such a destructive act that it has prompted colleges and universities to shut down entire sports seasons in an attempt to put an end to it. Unfortunately, it continues to resurface over and over again, despite such drastic efforts.

Prevalence of College-Level Hazing

Even though countless collegiate organizations have spoken out against hazing and have taken steps to reduce it on their campuses, the existence of hazing in college sports is still considered to be par for the course at many schools. But, just how prevalent is it?

Based on studies done over the last 15 years, college athletic hazing continues to be a problem, despite efforts by administrators and educators to end the devastating ‘rite of passage’. For example, a 1999 survey conducted by Alfred University showed that as many as 80% of college athletes in NCAA schools had been victim to hazing practices by teammates. In 2008, the University of Maine’s College of Education and Human Development conducted research that showed varsity teams (74%) and club sports groups (64%) were among the student organizations with the highest level of hazing activity.

Injuries Athletes Have Sustained as a Result of Hazing

The act of hazing is of great concern, not only for the emotional scars it leaves, but because hazing can cause irreversible physical and mental damage. The list of injuries sustained by college athletes during a hazing rite is extensive. It varies from hospitalization due to alcohol toxicity to traumatic brain injuries, and even death.

No official national hazing organization exists, so numbers are difficult to track. However, there has been at least one hazing-related death on college campuses every year since 1970. The percentage of those deaths that can be attributed to athletic hazing is unknown, however, sports teams and fraternities consistently have the highest number of hazing events reported.

Is Hazing a Form of Bullying?

The connection between bullying and hazing is a controversial one. Some consider hazing to be a form of bullying, while others believe that athletic hazing specifically is not bullying, in part because some of the actions are considered to be “voluntary” on the part of the victim. However, it’s an act of aggression, pressure, and intimidation where the victim is forced to endure humiliating, painful acts in order to be ‘accepted’ by his or her peers. So, college athletic hazing is a form of group bullying.

What to do if You Have been Hazed

Victims of hazing often don’t report it for reasons including embarrassment and the desire to be part of a group. However, if you’ve been hazed, or are feeling pressured to participate in the rituals, report it to your school immediately. Many schools have a way to report it anonymously, but still, some victims don’t feel comfortable either way. If that’s the case, contact the local police instead of campus security.

If you are unsure whether or not you should report the incident, consult your parents, clergy or other trusted family, friend or community member. This is especially important if you’ve been threatened. After all, if it’s happening to you, it’s happening to others, too.

Prevent and Raise Awareness to Hazing

Myriad groups, including Stop Hazing, Pacer, Stomp Out Bullying, and Hazing Prevention, sponsor events and provide anti-hazing education to the public. Even collegiate sports organizations, such as the NCAA, have anti-hazing programs in place. Of course, the end goal is to stop it altogether, but organizations can’t do it alone. Such a prevalent and historic issue requires help from the community at large.

Fortunately, there are ways that individuals can make a difference and help raise awareness about hazing to stop it in its tracks. Joining an anti-hazing group and participating in their events is a great place to start.

There is even a free app designed to make it easier to learn about and report hazing, as it “provides access to resources and state-by-state facts about hazing.” The app provides a list of local organizations and allows for the ability to send video or photos of the hazing event directly to the reporting agency of the user’s choice.

 

Awareness of the damage caused by hazing, as well as efforts to end it, should not be limited to the month of October. Diligence in resisting and ending hazing should be a year round endeavor on the parts of everyone. School administrations can’t end it without our help.

This guest post brought to you by Jason Lee.

Definitive Signs You May Have Sustained a Brain Injury

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that approximately 30 percent of all injury deaths are caused by a victim sustaining some type of traumatic brain or head injury. In the state of New York, close to 20,000 people are hospitalized or killed every single year as a result of sustaining injury to their head or brain.

While many people do not realize the severity of a brain injury, others will be forced to face the consequences of such an injury for the rest of their lives.

If you have received a blow to the head, you fell and hit your head or you suffered some other type of injury that caused your brain to get knocked around, medical attention should be sought at once. Bumps, cuts, scrapes and bruises can all be signs of head trauma. Losing consciousness, being unable to remember what happened during or prior to the accident and passing out are also signs that a serious injury has occurred. In some cases, there may be no visible signs of injury at all.

If you experience any of the following signs, you may have suffered a concussion or more severe type of brain injury:

  • Inability to concentrate
  • Difficulty remembering new information
  • Headaches
  • Blurry vision
  • Dizziness or light-headedness
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Sensitivity to noise or light
  • Trouble with balance
  • Extreme exhaustion
  • Dramatic changes in mood
  • More emotional than usual
  • Sleep problems

Common Events Capable of Causing Traumatic Brain Injury

Any time an individual receives a blow to the head, there is a definite possibility that he or she sustained some type of traumatic brain injury. The severity of the impact, the point of impact and a number of other factors will all affect the extent of injury.

The Mayo Clinic states that some of the most common events capable of causing traumatic brain injury include:

  • Slip and fall accidents
  • Falls off of raised surfaces
  • Car accidents and other vehicle-related collisions
  • Sports-related injuries
  • Violence or abuse
  • Explosions or other blasts, as often seen in combat situations

If you have recently been involved in an accident, it is important to get treated by a medical professional for a full assessment of your condition. Even if you do not feel any pain or notice any symptoms, go to a doctor so that he or she can give you a complete medical evaluation. There may be injuries that could become critical or fatal if not treated immediately. Seeking treatment could save your life.

This brain injury FAQs page can provide answers to some of the most frequently asked questions.

Tips to Help You Recover from Your Brain Injury

Not all concussions or traumatic head trauma will result in permanent brain damage. If you have suffered a concussion or other type of injury to your head or brain, it is important you take care of yourself. You can facilitate your recovery by getting sufficient rest, establishing a daily routine, asking for help when you need it, taking up a hobby and getting small amounts of exercise. Avoiding alcohol, caffeine and other stimulants is also beneficial.

If you believe your brain injury was caused as a result of another person’s negligence, carelessness or wrongful conduct, you are not alone. You may be able to pursue damages to cover your injury-related expenses with the help of a skilled attorney. An attorney can review your case and advise you of the legal options available to you.

The Link Between Motorcycle Helmets and Traumatic Brain Injury

Motorcycle accidents are a common cause of traumatic brain injuries. The number of riders suffering traumatic brain injuries has increased as states have repealed universal helmet laws requiring all riders to wear protective headgear. Of course, any motorcyclist can suffer a traumatic brain injury, whether or not they’re wearing a helmet. But riders not wearing helmets are at much greater risk of suffering traumatic brain injuries.

Unfortunately, many drivers of cars and trucks are not alert for oncoming motorcycles. All experienced bikers know this. This puts motorcyclists at a far greater risk of a collision and of suffering brain injury or death in an accident. When you are on a motorcycle, there are no airbags and no safety belts. There is nothing standing between you and the pavement passing beneath your wheels. A helmet is the best protection available.

How Common Are Motorcycle Accidents and Serious Injuries?

A report by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) analyzed the connection between motorcycle helmet use and head injuries based on more than 100,000 motorcyclists involved in crashes in 18 states. Approximately 57 percent of the riders were wearing helmets and 43 percent were not wearing helmets at the time of the motorcycle accident. Unhelmeted riders suffered nearly twice the percentage of head and facial injuries as those wearing helmets, the researchers found.

The researchers noted that 21 percent of the riders not wearing helmets suffered traumatic brain injury compared to 15 percent of those wearing helmets. The severity of the brain injury also correlated with helmet use. Seven percent of bikers not wearing helmets suffered severe traumatic brain injury in a motorcycle accident, while 4.7 of the riders wearing helmets had a severe TBI.
While some motorcyclists are adamant about their right to choose whether to wear a helmet, there is compelling evidence that helmets improve a rider’s odds of surviving a collision with less severe injuries.

A traumatic brain injury has a profound effect on a cyclist’s ultimate recovery. Hospital charges for those with a TBI were 13 times higher than for those who didn’t suffer such an injury. Further, those with a TBI were far less likely to be discharged home from the hospital. Riders with brain injuries are much more likely to require ongoing medical care and to be transferred to a rehabilitation center or nursing home. Finally, those with such brain injuries are more likely to die. Only diagnosed in 17 percent of hospital-admitted motorcycle accident victims, TBI sufferers accounted for 54 percent of accident fatalities.

Many States Have Partial Helmet Laws, Reducing Compliance

In the 1960s, the federal government encouraged states to enact universal motorcycle helmet laws requiring all riders to wear helmets by making certain kinds of federal aid available only to states that had helmet laws in place. In states that institute universal helmet laws, the rate of motorcycle fatalities and brain injuries typically drops, according to Consumer Reports. When such laws are repealed, the rates climb again.

In 1976, Congress stopped the U.S. Department of Transportation from penalizing states that did not have universal helmet laws, and state lawmakers began weakening or repealing the helmet laws.
Only 19 states in the U.S. have universal helmet laws. Twenty-eight states have partial laws requiring some motorcyclists to wear helmets. Oklahoma, for example, has a partial helmet law, requiring riders age 17 and younger to wear helmets. The NHTSA has found that in states with partial helmet laws, there is a lower compliance rate with the helmet law because of the difficulty police have in determining who is underage.  Less than 40 percent of minors involved in fatal accidents were wearing helmets, the NHTSA said.

As a motorcycle accident lawyer may tell you, if you’re not wearing a helmet, an insurance company will argue that you contributed in part to your own injury even if the accident wasn’t your fault. You may have more difficulty collecting compensation to pay your medical bills.

For some motorcyclists, helmets are uncomfortable or seem a distraction. But when faced with the alternative, it seems to be an easy decision to make.

Tis the Season for DUIs

Dui

We are in the vortex of the holiday season and one of the most festive times of year. Whether we’re celebrating with a karaoke machine at an office party, meeting up with old college roommates at some “old haunts” or winding down with family after a huge meal, chances are there’s alcohol involved. A little red wine or a shot of whiskey will bring life to any gathering, but it’s easy to go overboard, especially during the holidays. Many party people don’t intend to drink as much as they do, but still end up driving under the influence of alcohol. Not only is driving drunk illegal, but it is one of the most preventable types of car accidents. Unfortunately most drunk drivers (even “just the buzzed” ones) realize their bad decision until it’s too late; when they are facing a suspended license, a traffic violation, or time behind bars for killing an innocent motorist or pedestrian.

Drive Sober This Holiday Season

Drunk driving is a problem of epidemic proportions, but despite the efforts to educate young and old, amp up enforcement, or make laws stricter, alcohol related accidents continue to occur. According to the United States Department of Transportation, every 2 hours, three people are killed in alcohol-related highway crashes. It’s not to say that all efforts to prevent drunk driving are lost, but drivers must change their thinking and the way they choose to drive. Whether it means sacrificing a night of inebriated fun to be the designated driver or park the car and take a taxi home, making a commitment to be one less drunk driver on the road can save lives.

Many drivers assume that just having one or two drinks during the course of the evening gives them an automatic “ok” to get behind the wheel. Sure, you may have eaten a meal with your beer or drank a lot of water in between those cocktails and you might feel completely fine, but even a small amount of alcohol can start to impair your judgment. According to the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, alcohol affects some people more quickly than they might think or feel.

Take a 150 lb. man. He’s at a holiday party, milling about with a beer in his hand, chatting with co-workers and after 20 minutes, he has finished his drink. His estimated Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) level is about 0.02%, which is well below the legal limit of 0.08%. But even at a low BAC he might be feeling relaxed and his visual functions may begin to be impaired, as well as his judgment. After he finishes his beer, his officemate hands him a shot of hard alcohol. Within a short minute’s time, his BAC reaches close to 0.05%, at this point he should not consider driving as he may be impaired and his reaction time, coordination, and ability to track moving objects has slowed down considerably.

While everyone’s body reacts differently to alcohol, depending on their weight, overall health, and the type of drink, impairment can occur quickly. Your best prevention to being involved in a drunk driving accident is to make the verbal commitment not to drive while under the influence.

Say “Yes” to Holiday Celebrations and “No” to Drunk Driving

Are you afraid of being viewed as the “square” of the party because you refuse to drive even after a few drinks? If you have friends who will judge you for drinking responsibly, you should find more responsible and caring friends! If you have and your pals have a full calendar of parties this holiday season, why not carpool and take turns being a designated driver? Not only will you be saving gas, but you will also be saving lives during the holidays. Instead of exchanging gifts this year, why not give your friends the gift of being a sober driver? If you notice a partygoer who is contemplating driving while drunk, pay it forward and pay for a taxi fare. There are plenty of fun, lifesaving gift ideas to keep you and your loved ones safe from an alcohol-related accident.

 

Drive Sober and Save Up for Something Special

If you or someone you know is the type that thinks that “just a few drinks won’t affect me”, think again. Your choice to abstain from driving under the influence could be lifesaving this holiday season. Need more reason to say no? The typical DUI costs about $10,000 after all is done (including fees, fines, and bail). Would you rather pay off a not-so-smart DUI or would you rather buy tickets for your family to some place warm to escape the winter weather?

Helmets Save Lives

helmet safety

To some people, helmets might seem like a hassle. But if you enjoy bike riding, own a motorcycle or play certain sports like football and skateboarding, you should know that a helmet is crucial in preventing brain or spinal cord injuries. Studies have shown that helmets worn properly reduce the risk of severe, lifelong injuries.

If You Cycle, Wear A Helmet

In a recent Cyclist Safety Report by the city of Boston, MA, it was cited that helmets have reduced the risk of head injury of up to 85% and reduce the risk of brain injury by up to 88%. In the study, it was found that men between the ages of 25 and 35 are more likely to be involved in a bicycle crash. Ten percent of crashes ended with the cyclist going to the hospital.

What Are Helmet Laws?

Many states have laws that require motorcyclists and cyclists to wear helmets. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, fatalities and injuries decline when helmet laws are enacted. Consequently, when helmet laws are repealed, fatalities increase. Not all states have laws that require riders to wear helmets. None of the fifty states require everyone to wear helmets while riding a bicycle (21 states require riders under a certain age to wear helmets), according to the Governor’s Highway Safety Association. Nineteen states require all motorcyclists to wear helmets, while Illinois, Iowa and New Hampshire have no helmet laws for motorcyclists at all.

What Are The Best Helmets To Buy?

According to the New York State Department of Health, effective helmets should be made of polystyrene, a sturdy material that absorbs the impact of a fall or collision. Foam pads will not effectively prevent brain injury like polystyrene can. Make sure the helmet fits your head snugly, and can be adjusted with straps to prevent it from moving around. Bicycle helmets are required by law to meet the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission standards for safety (they should have a CPSC sticker to show that they meet these requirements).

Medical Malpractice: Cosmetic Surgeries and Anesthesia Dangers

cosmetic surgery

Anesthesia comes in several different varieties. Some of the worst medical mistakes involve anesthesia and, if you’ve been the victim of such a mistake, you may want to consider speaking with a medical malpractice attorney. Where cosmetic procedures are concerned, you may be given any one of the four major types of anesthesia. Anesthesia dangers are issues in any such situation and you should be informed of these dangers before the procedure is undertaken.

The Four Types of Anesthesia

The four most common types of anesthesia are listed below, from the NIH.

Local Anesthesia

This is the least intensive form of anesthesia. You may have had this used when you’ve had minor procedures done that may not have been terribly involved but which may have been very painful without this procedure. Local anesthesia leaves you awake and fully alert and aware of your surroundings. It merely numbs the area being operated on. This type of anesthesia is used by dentists, doctors and other professionals who may perform procedures that would otherwise be horribly uncomfortable.

Intravenous Sedation, IV Sedation

This type of anesthesia combines a sedative and an analgesic to kill the pain. You’ll generally be awake after having this type of anesthesia. Sedation dentistry oftentimes utilizes this type of anesthesia to make long and painful procedures bearable. It is also used for some cosmetic procedures, provided the pain involved is not likely to be too extreme.

Regional Anesthesia

This type of anesthesia blocks out all the pain signals from a specific area of the body. Women going through labor oftentimes have this done so that they don’t have to deal with the pain. This procedure may be used on limbs or other areas of the body. Cosmetic procedures may be done under this type of anesthesia to avoid some of the dangers that go along with general anesthesia.

General Anesthesia

This is the most extreme form of anesthesia. It involves bringing you to the point where you are unconscious and where you feel nothing at all. You will have no memory of what happened when you awake from this type of anesthesia. It is also the most dangerous form of anesthesia and takes a great deal of training to perform. This type of anesthesia is used in many cosmetic procedures and carries with it great risks.

Anesthesia mistakes involve everything from not giving enough medication and leaving patients fully aware and feeling a procedure, but unable to move. It can involve accidental death and other outcomes, as well.

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